MAJOR RESEARCH PROJECTS

Our Ongoing Projects

1. UNDERSTANDING PERCEPTUAL DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES ABOUT EMOTIONAL STIMULI

Our daily life is filled with emotionally charged stimuli or information, such as happy, fearful, and angry faces. Many of these emotional stimuli are easy to recognize, but others can be quite ambiguous to categorize. Most of us identify these visual stimuli easily and have little problem extracting the emotional information from what we see. At least, that is what we believe. An automatic task, such as recognizing a fearful face, involves complex computations carried out by the human brain.


This project aims at elucidating the psychological, computational, and neural processes giving rise to emotion-related visual perceptual decision-making. Furthermore, we investigate how these processes may be related to psychopathology, such as anxiety and depression. 

Methodology: questionnaires, computer-based behavioral paradigms, eye-tracking, computational modeling, and neuroimaging (fMRI, EEG and intracranial EEG).

2. COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF MENTAL DISORDERS

What we can measure behaviorally and through questionnaires are the outputs of hidden mental processes. This project utilizes computer simulation and real human data to gain insights into the hidden computational mechanisms of various mental disorders, in particular anxiety, depression, and psychosis.

Methodology: computer-based behavioral paradigms, questionnaires, computational modeling.

3. IDENTIFY NEURAL CORRELATES AND RISK FACTORS OF DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY.

Collaborating with research teams in the United States, our lab has been involved in investigating neural risk factors related to pediatric depression and anxiety disorders, mainly using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Methodology: neuroimaging (fMRI, EEG) and questionnaires.

 

Our lab is always interested in developing novel task paradigms for investigating psychological and neural mechanisms of value-based and emotion-related decision-making processes.
We are also interested in developing new generation task paradigms for clinical research.